• Chromosomes
    May 23, 2016

    Older men missing Y chromosome in blood more likely to develop Alzheimer’s

    Researchers tracking older men have found an association between the loss of the male-only Y chromosome in blood cells and higher likelihood of Alzheimer’s diagnosis.

    Dr. Chris Lau, Professor, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco: "Although informative, the study is preliminary in nature and only highlights the fact that the Y chromosome could serve important functions beyond male sex determination and sperm production. What exactly..."

    Dr. Thomas Wingo, Assistant Professor, Emory University School of Medicine: "The hypothesis is intriguing but I am left with a number of unanswered questions. Any single test is probably not going to be a realistic biomarker for..."

  • Cornheap
    May 17, 2016

    National Academies report looks at 30 years of GE crops, advocates changes to regulation

    The National Academies has published a wide-ranging report on the impact of genetically engineered crops, recommending U.S. regulations should focus on individual products, not the process by which they were made.

    Dr. David Stern, Professor and President of the Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research: "The NAS report is timely and wide-ranging, yet provides few definitive conclusions to satisfy a contentious scientific and social context..."

    Dr. Wayne Parrott, Professor, Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, University of Georgia: "The inescapable conclusion, after reading the report, is the GE crops are pretty much just crops..."

    Plus 13 more experts...

  • dna-163466_1280
    May 13, 2016

    Harvard meeting on synthesizing human genome questioned over secrecy

    A project that would synthesize a complete human genome and test it in cells within 10 years was discussed at a meeting of scientists, ethicists, lawyers, and entrepreneurs at Harvard University on May 10. Commentators raised concerns that the meeting was closed to the press and public

    Dr. Kris Saha, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison:"The idea of making a synthetic human cell is certainly an ambitious project. It’s a big leap..."

    Dr. Sriram Kosuri, Assistant Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry Department, University of California Los Angeles:"There are many challenges to chemically synthesize a complete human genome from scratch, so it's interesting as a thought experiment. Currently, our synthetic capacity, our design capabilities..."

  • calf-652651_960_720
    May 10, 2016

    Cows made hornless through gene-editing, with no off-target effects

    A letter in Nature Biotechnology reports the rearing of two young dairy cows whose genomes were edited to make them hornless.

    Dr. William Muir, Professor Genetics, Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University: “This is very exciting for several reasons. First, it is possible to insert an important natural genetic difference causing hornless cattle in a very elite animal of high genetic worth in a short period of time..."

    Dr. Willard Eyestone, Research Associate Professor, Reproductive Biology / Biotechnology, Virginia Tech: “Although these cattle have been in the works for some time, this is the first peer-reviewed paper to document that editing the genetic sequence responsible for horns does in fact yield ‘hornless’ or polled animals..."

Latest Expert Analysis

Chromosomes
May 23, 2016

Older men missing Y chromosome in blood more likely to develop Alzheimer’s

Researchers tracking older men have found an association between the loss of the male-only Y chromosome in blood cells and higher likelihood of Alzheimer’s diagnosis. Continue reading


HIV_H9_T-cell
May 20, 2016

Researchers report using CRISPR to remove HIV DNA in live animals for the first time

The removal of HIV virus DNA from the genomes of live animals using CRISPR-Cas9 has been reported in the journal Gene Therapy. Continue reading


mitochondria
May 19, 2016

Mitochondrial replacement: Study identifies challenge for effectiveness of potential therapies

Researchers report that a small amount of mitochondrial DNA carried over in mitochondrial replacement techniques can occasionally increase over time, which could pose a problem for clinical therapies aiming to completely remove faulty mitochondrial DNA. Continue reading


Cornheap
May 17, 2016

National Academies report looks at 30 years of GE crops, advocates changes to regulation

The National Academies has published a wide-ranging assessment of the impact of genetically engineered crops. The report recommends U.S. regulations need to focus on individual products, not the process by which they were made. Continue reading


dna-163466_1280
May 13, 2016

Harvard meeting on synthesizing human genome questioned over secrecy

A project that would synthesize a complete human genome and test it in cells within 10 years was discussed at a meeting of scientists, ethicists, lawyers, and entrepreneurs at Harvard University on May 10. Continue reading


15637934219_ffd0a87bd2_o
May 10, 2016

Commercial lab releases genomic analysis of burger products, reports hygiene and quality issues

The company Clear Labs performed a genomic analysis of 258 U.S. burger products, and reported that 13.6% of the products had problems with substitution, hygienic issues or pathogenic contamination. Continue reading


calf-652651_960_720
May 10, 2016

Cows made hornless through gene-editing, with no off-target effects

A letter in Nature Biotechnology reports the rearing of two young dairy cows whose genomes were edited to make them hornless, with no off-target effects. Continue reading


maxresdefault
May 6, 2016

Probiotic milk impacts stress response, gene expression in human trial

Students who drank probiotic milk before taking exams showed fewer signs of stress than students drinking standard milk, with a strong difference between the groups observed in the expression of 179 stress-related genes. Continue reading


Embryo,_8_cells
May 4, 2016

Scientists break record for lab-grown human embryos, raising questions over research rules

Two separate research teams publishing in Nature and Nature Cell Biology have reported culturing human embryos up to 13 days, raising questions over international agreement to limit embryo research to 14 days of development. Continue reading


640px-Lab_mouse_mg_3263
May 2, 2016

Antibody protects mice against Zika infection

Researchers have reported that an antibody protected Zika-infected mice against the virus, in a small trial of ten mice. The authors say a humanized version of the antibody could be a potential therapy for Zika infection. Continue reading


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